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DNA Forensics : Displaying 127-146 of 362


How Innocent Man's DNA Was Found at Killing Sceneby Henry K. LeeSan Francisco ChronicleJune 26th, 2013An innocent man was charged with murder and spent five months in jail, despite having what prosecutors acknowledged was an airtight alibi.
Police Agencies Are Assembling Records of DNAby Joseph GoldsteinThe New York TimesJune 12th, 2013A growing number of local law enforcement agencies across the country have begun amassing their own DNA databases of potential suspects, some collected with the donors’ knowledge, and some without it.
Should Police Use DNA to Investigate a Suspect’s Family Members?by Nanibaa’ A. Garrison, Rori V. Rohlfs, and Stephanie M. Fullerton, Biopolitical Times guest contributorsJune 11th, 2013A DNA-based technique called familial searching can help police solve serious crimes. It can also be abused in ways that expose innocent people to unwarranted police surveillance.
Welcome to the “Genetic Panopticon”by Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJune 5th, 2013In a forceful blow to the Fourth Amendment, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that police can collect DNA from people who have been arrested – but who have not been convicted, and may never be.
California DNA Law is Broader Than Program Upheld by Supreme Courtby Maura DolanThe Los Angeles TimesJune 3rd, 2013The Supreme Court's decision allowing authorities to take DNA from people when they are arrested may not mean that California's DNA collection program will survive court challenges.
They’re Coming for Your DNAby Emily BazelonSlateJune 3rd, 2013The Supreme Court just made it much easier for the government to collect genetic information.
Justices Allow DNA Collection After an Arrestby Adam LiptakThe New York TimesJune 3rd, 2013The Supreme Court ruled that the police may take DNA samples from people arrested in connection with serious crimes, prior to conviction.
UK Building DNA Database in the NHS 'By Stealth'by Helen WallacePublic Service EuropeMay 23rd, 2013The plan involves sequencing the DNA of everyone in England and adding this information as an attachment to each person's medical file.
California Bill Would Prevent Genetic-Testing Firms from Using Surreptitiously Obtained DNAby Jessica ShugartMercury NewsMay 23rd, 2013Under current California law, genetic testing companies can reveal your most intimate biological secrets to anybody, without your knowledge or permission. A new bill may change that.
Branstad Signs Bill Widening DNA Sampling to Misdemeanor CasesAssociated PressMay 16th, 2013People convicted of certain aggravated misdemeanors in Iowa now will be required to submit DNA samples to the federal DNA database.
The DNA in Your Garbage: Up For Grabsby Kevin HartnettThe Boston GlobeMay 12th, 2013Drop a hair? Anyone can legally sequence your genetic material—and privacy experts want to close that gap.
Brain Scans Predict Which Criminals are More Likely to Reoffendby Regina NuzzoNatureMarch 25th, 2013Neuroscientists say they have found a way to predict whether convicted felons are likely to commit crimes again from looking at their brain scans.
Privacy and Progress Inspires California Genetic Information Privacy Billby Nicolle StrandPresidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical IssuesMarch 12th, 2013A California State Senator introduced a bill declaring the intent of the legislature to enact new, comprehensive genetic privacy protections in the state.
What Is a Gene And How Does it Apply to the Law? The Supreme Court Still Doesn't Know.by Brian ResnickNational JournalMarch 2nd, 2013DNA was discovered 60 years ago this week, and since then it's been muddling up the legal system.
Justices Wrestle Over Allowing DNA Sampling at Time of Arrestby Adam LiptakThe New York TimesFebruary 26th, 2013The Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that one justice said is "perhaps the most important criminal procedure case that this court has heard in decades.”
DNA and the Constitution[Editorial]The New York TimesFebruary 24th, 2013The substantial harm to innocent people that could result from the misuse of DNA greatly outweighs the benefits. And the safeguard against such harm is the Fourth Amendment, whose fundamental protections the Maryland court upheld. The Supreme Court should do likewise.
Gene-ism and the Trout in the Milkby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesFebruary 19th, 2013The remains of King Richard III were not really identified by DNA, but that was what the headlines said.
Sale of Personal Gene Data Condemned as 'Unethical and Dangerous'by Jamie DowardThe Guardian February 16th, 2013Critics say companies could acquire personal information that would identify National Health Service patients without their consent.
Too Much InformationSupreme Court 2013: Why collecting DNA from people who are arrested won’t help solve more crimes.by Brandon L. Garrett and Erin MurphySlateFebruary 12th, 2013Research shows that police solve more crimes not by taking DNA from suspects who have never been convicted, but by collecting more evidence at crime scenes.
Will Pre-Conviction DNA Collection Become the National Norm?by Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesFebruary 7th, 2013The United States Supreme Court will hear a case later this month that will determine the legality of collecting DNA from people who are arrested for but not convicted of any crime.
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