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DNA Forensics : Displaying 127-146 of 294


Tens of Thousands of Children Have Their DNA Stored by Police, Even if They are Not Charged With Any Crime by Matt BlakeDaily Mail (UK)April 27th, 2012Some police forces are collecting DNA from children as young as ten. Campaigners brand the practice 'bonkers.'
Maryland Law Enforcement Agencies Still Collecting DNA Samplesby Yvonne WengerBaltimore SunApril 25th, 2012Despite a recent court ruling by the state's top court, Maryland police say they will continue to collect DNA samples from people arrested but not convicted for certain crimes.
Md. High Court Strikes Down DNA Collection at Arrest by Yvonne WengerBaltimore SunApril 24th, 2012Defying government and law-enforcement interest in expanding DNA profiling, Maryland's high court rules that collection of DNA at arrest violates civil rights.
Anonymous DNA? No, It's Notby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesApril 19th, 2012An article in Nature Genetics essentially says that keeping aggregated DNA data anonymous is impossible, which raises important questions about privacy and the conduct of research.
New York Expands DNA Database . . . Again by Osagie K. ObasogieApril 5th, 2012Governor Cuomo signed an “all crimes” bill into law in late March, making New York the first state to require anyone convicted of a crime – including small misdemeanors like skipping transit fare – to submit DNA to the state database.
Calls for Inquiry Into 'Astonishing' DNA Error by Paul PeacheyThe IndependentMarch 31st, 2012The second embarrassment admitted this month by Britain's biggest private forensic science laboratory.
New York State Set to Add All Convict DNA to Its Databaseby John Eligon and Thomas KaplanNew York TimesMarch 14th, 2012New York is poised to establish one of the most expansive DNA databases in the nation, requiring DNA samples to accompany all convictions.
New Initiative Aims to Boost Human Rights Standards for DNA Forensicsby Daniel SharpBiopolitical TimesMarch 8th, 2012GeneWatch UK, Council for Responsible Genetics, and Privacy International launch a new collaborative initiative on DNA forensics.
The Case Against DNAby William LangleyThe TelegraphMarch 6th, 2012Genetic profiling was once hailed as a magical tool to catch criminals. So why is it now in danger of being discredited?
Appeals Court Upholds DNA Testing of Felony Suspectsby Carol J. WilliamsLos Angeles TimesFebruary 24th, 2012A panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that collecting DNA samples from people arrested in a felony case doesn't violate their protection from unreasonable searches and seizure.
Chief Judge Backs Broader DNA TestingAssociated PressFebruary 15th, 2012New York's chief judge urges expansion of the state's forensic DNA database.
Expanded N.Y. DNA Database Would Seek To Exonerate the Innocent, Expose the GuiltyCBS New YorkJanuary 11th, 2012Critics are raising several concerns over NY Gov. Cuomo's plan to dramatically expand the state's DNA database.
Gov. Cuomo Plan Pushes DNA Samples from All People Convicted of a Crime in New York State of State initiative would add DNA from all misdemeanors to databaseby Glenn BlainNew York Daily NewsJanuary 8th, 2012In his State of the State Address Wednesday, Gov. Cuomo called for a vast expansion of the state’s DNA database to include samples from persons convicted of “all crimes,” including misdemeanors.
Police Can Identify Suspect's Eye Colour from DNA New ScientistDecember 13th, 2011A new tool can predict whether DNA left at a crime scene has come from someone with blue or brown eyes, or something in between. It's the first time such a tool has been available.
Signs of Skepticism About DNA Forensicsby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesDecember 1st, 2011Several recent editorials and other articles are expressing a more nuanced view of the issues involved in DNA forensic databases.
Stop the Genetic DragnetPolice currently collect samples of DNA from detainees—retaining the DNA even if a suspect turns out to be innocentby The EditorsScientific AmericanNovember 22nd, 2011Police in about 25 states and federal agents can take a DNA sample after arresting, and before charging, someone. If they are cleared, their DNA stays downtown, a record that is hard to erase.
St. Louis Officers to File Suit over Department's DNA Collectionby Christine ByersSt. Louis Post-DispatchNovember 14th, 2011The St. Louis Police Officers' Association filed a grievance saying the department's collection of DNA from police officers is a violation of Fourth Amendment rights and the officers' contract.
MBTA to swap spit with FBI databaseby Richard WeirBoston HeraldNovember 5th, 2011DNA profiles of saliva evidence, taken as part of a new transit police crackdown on spitting assaults against MBTA workers, will be stored indefinitely in an FBI-run databank.
Visa Wants to Make Money off Your DNAby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesNovember 3rd, 2011Visa has filed a patent application for a process that would use, among other sources, DNA databases to identify potential advertising targets.
Police Balk At Submitting Their Own DNA to Forensic Databasesby Osagie K. ObasagieBiopolitical TimesOctober 20th, 2011Despite their ardent support for expanding DNA databases for criminals and non-convicted arrestees, many police officers are refusing to submit their own DNA, calling it a civil rights violation.
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