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DNA Forensics : Displaying 127-146 of 378


Welsh Police Take DNA Samples from more than 5,500 Children by James McCarthyWales OnlineSeptember 22nd, 2013A 12-month-old baby is among the thousands who were swabbed by Wales’ four forces as part of their investigations since 2010.
Maryland v. King: Three Concerns about Policing and Genetic Informationby Elizabeth E. JohGenomics Law ReportSeptember 19th, 2013The decision in Maryland v. King affirmed that DNA databanking in the criminal justice system is here to stay, but the majority opinion raises at least three potentially troubling concerns about policing and genetic privacy.
After Disasters, DNA Science Is Helpful, But Often Too Priceyby Christopher JoyceNPRSeptember 13th, 2013Forensic scientists who use DNA for identifying the unnamed casualties of natural disasters and war say the technology isn't always available where it's most needed, like in poor countries, or in war zones like Syria.
David Langwallner: DNA Database is Welcome but it Will Need Safeguardsby David LangwallnerIndependent.ieSeptember 9th, 2013The Irish Innocence Project welcomes the new Irish DNA database bill, but the retention of DNA from non-convicted persons raises genuine concern as to the length of time such material can be retained.
More Concerns Over Familial DNA Searchingby Osagie K. ObasogieBiopolitical TimesAugust 28th, 2013A recent paper by Rori Rohlfs et. al., and two accompanying videos, suggest that real concerns still remain with familial searching in California's DNA databases.
Study Probes DNA Search Method that Led to 'Grim Sleeper' Suspectby Eryn BrownLos Angeles TimesAugust 15th, 2013DNA-based familial searches may mistakenly identify individuals in a forensic database as siblings or parents of an unknown perpetrator, when in fact they are distant relatives.
Elementary, My Dear Fluffy: Cat DNA Solves Another Homicideby Alan BoyleNBC NewsAugust 14th, 2013DNA from cat hairs has helped crack a homicide case, demonstrating again the power of genetic pet databases to solve crimes.
The Fallibility of DNAby Michael RisherThe New York TimesJuly 31st, 2013The myth of DNA infallibility has another dimension: when the government warehouses DNA samples on a large scale, we increase the chances that innocent citizens might be arrested and jailed.
UK Forensic Science Slammed by Inquiryby Daniel CresseyNatureJuly 25th, 2013UK government failures over forensic science are leading to fragmentation, research gaps and possibly even miscarriages of justice, according to a parliamentary inquiry on the subject.
High-Tech, High-Risk Forensicsby Osagie K. ObasogieThe New York TimesJuly 24th, 2013For far too long, we have allowed the myth of DNA infallibility to chip away at our skepticism of government’s prosecutorial power, undoubtedly leading to untold injustices.
Rising Use of DNA to Nab Low-Level Criminalsby Ben FinleyInquirerJuly 20th, 2013The use of genetic material to catch low-level criminals, mostly for property crimes, is growing nationwide.
FBI Announces Review of 2,000 Cases Featuring Hair Samplesby Michael DoyleMcClatchy Washington BureauJuly 18th, 2013The FBI will review thousands of old cases to see whether analysts exaggerated the significance of their hair analyses or reported them inaccurately.
Is Your DNA in a Police Database?by Jill LawlessAssociated PressJuly 12th, 2013Countries around the world are collecting genetic material from millions of citizens in the name of fighting crime and terrorism — and, according to critics, heading into uncharted ethical terrain.
Expansion Of The Genetic Surveillance State: Taking The Blood Of Babies Born To Mississippi Teensby Kashmir HillForbesJuly 2nd, 2013A new law requires Mississippi hospitals to store the blood of babies born to mothers 16 and younger - "a very invasive law to a woman who is already in a vulnerable situation."
Supreme Court Backs DNA Collection in Arrests[Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Michael FitzhughThe Burrill ReportJune 28th, 2013The ruling opens a door for law enforcement, but raises privacy and social justice concerns.
From Suspects to the Spitterati: A collision of power, profit, and privacyby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJune 27th, 2013DNA collection is increasingly ubiquitous, and the push for access to genetic information is gaining momentum. What questions should we be considering?
How Innocent Man's DNA Was Found at Killing Sceneby Henry K. LeeSan Francisco ChronicleJune 26th, 2013An innocent man was charged with murder and spent five months in jail, despite having what prosecutors acknowledged was an airtight alibi.
Police Agencies Are Assembling Records of DNAby Joseph GoldsteinThe New York TimesJune 12th, 2013A growing number of local law enforcement agencies across the country have begun amassing their own DNA databases of potential suspects, some collected with the donors’ knowledge, and some without it.
Should Police Use DNA to Investigate a Suspect’s Family Members?by Nanibaa’ A. Garrison, Rori V. Rohlfs, and Stephanie M. Fullerton, Biopolitical Times guest contributorsJune 11th, 2013A DNA-based technique called familial searching can help police solve serious crimes. It can also be abused in ways that expose innocent people to unwarranted police surveillance.
Welcome to the “Genetic Panopticon”by Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJune 5th, 2013In a forceful blow to the Fourth Amendment, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that police can collect DNA from people who have been arrested – but who have not been convicted, and may never be.
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