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About Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, & Intersex Communities & Human Biotechnology


New genetic and reproductive technologies affect LGBTQI communities in exceptional ways.

Some of these are beneficial. For example, advances in assisted reproductive technologies enable a growing number of gay men and lesbians to become parents of biologically related children.

However, some advocates of reproductive cloning assert that gays and lesbians in particular should support it, because it would allow same-sex couples to have children that are genetically related only to a member of the couple, free of "external" DNA. Of course, such techniques do nothing to address the underlying issues of inequality and homophobia that plague society.

Genetic theories play as strong a role in shaping our social and individual identities as they do in shaping our families. Recent years have seen a resurgence of assumptions that complex human behaviors, including sexual orientation, are simply products of our genes. Though scientists have yet to find a genetic marker for homosexuality, many continue to try. Such genetic determinism and reductionism open the door to new forms of discrimination.



Designer babies: an ethical horror waiting to happen?by Philip BallThe Guardian January 8th, 2017A perfectly feasible 10-20% improvement in health via PGD, added to the comparable advantage that wealth already brings, could lead to a widening of the health gap between rich and poor, both within a society and between nations.
We Launched a New Website! Surrogacy360by Kiki Zeldes, Biopolitical Times guest contributorDecember 14th, 2016Surrogacy360 provides accurate information and resources, free of commercial interest, for people considering surrogacy outside the United States.
New ​Chair of ​our ​Diversity ​and​ Health Disparities​ Research Cluster​ on Colorblindness and the Need for a New Biopoliticsby Sara GrossmanHaas Institute, UC BerkeleyDecember 2nd, 2016In a faculty profile interview, CGS Fellow Osagie Obasogie discusses colorblindness and biopolitics.
With Fertility Rate in China Low, Some Press to Legalize Births Outside Marriageby Didi Kirsten TatlowThe New York TimesNovember 17th, 2016Civil society groups are calling for greater reproductive freedom for single women, which would also affect lesbians.
A Call to Protect the Health of Women Who Donate Their Eggsby Judy Norsigian and Dr. Timothy R.B. JohnsonThe Womenís Health ActivistNovember 12th, 2016The egg market is growing, yet long-term safety data does not exist to enable donors to make informed choices about selling their eggs.
Iím a disabled American. Trumpís policies will be a disaster for people like me.by Ari Ne'emanVoxNovember 9th, 2016The anticipated loss of support infrastructure that is essential to living with a disability may lead to greater solidarity from other progressive groups.
Genetics startup Genos wants to pay you for your DNA databy Sarah BuhrTech CrunchNovember 1st, 2016Company plans to pay participants for full genome sequencing, starting with exomes, to create a disease variant map.
The Ethics of Hunting Down 'Patient Zero'by Donald G. McNeil, Jr.The New York TimesOctober 29th, 2016The debunking of a myth raises a moral question about a regular feature of journalism: Is it right to hunt down the first case in any outbreak?
H.I.V. Arrived in the U.S. Long Before 'Patient Zero'by Donald G. McNeil Jr.New York TimesOctober 26th, 2016Recently uncovered evidence clears the assumed "source" of AIDS epidemic, and provides a window into cultural disease myths.
Mouse eggs made from skin cells in a dishby David CyranoskiNatureOctober 17th, 2016A research breakthrough sparks debate over the prospect of using stem cell techniques to produce synthetic human eggs from body tissue.
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