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About Global Governance & Human Biotechnology


Several important international bodies have adopted human biotechnology policies, though most regulation takes place at the national level.

International organizations have taken strong stands to prevent human reproductive cloning and inheritable genetic modification. The Council of Europe's Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (1997)—the most authoritative international agreement to date—bans inheritable genetic modification, human reproductive cloning, and research cloning while also regulating other human biotechnologies.

UNESCO, the European Parliament, the Group of Eight industrial nations, the World Health Assembly, and the United Nations have also adopted various prohibitions on human reproductive cloning.



Lightly Regulated In Vitro Fertilization Yields Thousands of Babies Annually[Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Michael OlloveThe Washington PostApril 13th, 2015Both the federal government and the states have given the multi-billion-dollar industry a wide berth, which makes this country very much an outlier compared with the rest of the developed world.
Calling for “More than a Moratorium” on Human Germline Modificationby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesApril 9th, 2015A broader array of critical responses and policy suggestions follows recent reports that the gene-editing technique CRISPR has been used to genetically modify human sperm, eggs or embryos.
Genetic Engineering & The Future of Humankindby Jamie MetzlIvy MagazineApril 9th, 2015We’re on the verge of this fundamental transformation, not just of our reproductive processes, but of how we think of ourselves as humans.
The Next Manhattan Projectby Patrick TuckerThe AtlanticApril 7th, 2015Anticipating cutting-edge scientific research before it happens may be key to protecting against bioterrorism.
Human Genetic Engineering Demands more than a Moratoriumby Sheila Jasanoff, J. Benjamin Hurlbut and Krishanu SahaThe GuardianApril 7th, 2015Expert calls for a moratorium on germline gene engineering are no substitute for richer public debate on the ethics and politics of our biotechnological futures.
New DNA Tech: Creating Unicorns and Curing Cancer for Real?by David Ewing DuncanThe Daily BeastMarch 30th, 2015We have the earth-shattering technology in our hands—but even its inventors worry about its awesome power to alter our genetic future.
A Tipping Point on Human Germline Modification?by Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesMarch 19th, 2015Amidst reports that human embryos have been modified using the gene editing technique CRISPR, several groups of scientists have issued statements proposing moratoria on human germline genome editing.
Public interest group condemns human germline modification efforts, supports research moratorium, calls for US prohibition[Press Statement]March 19th, 2015We're at a watershed moment in determining whether human genetic technologies will be used in the public interest and for the common good, or in ways that are dangerous and socially pernicious.
The Many Ethical Implications of Emerging Technologies by Nayef Al-RodhanScientific AmericanMarch 13th, 2015Brainlike computer chips, smart pharmacology and other advances offer great promise but also raise serious questions that we must deal with now.
With World Watching, UK Allows Experiments to Genetically Alter Babiesby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesMarch 4th, 2015Despite several possibly insurmountable legal and safety hurdles, the House of Lords gave the final approval needed to move into fertility clinics the embryo modification techniques referred to as “mitochondrial donation.”
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