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About Global Governance & Human Biotechnology

Several important international bodies have adopted human biotechnology policies, though most regulation takes place at the national level.

International organizations have taken strong stands to prevent human reproductive cloning and inheritable genetic modification. The Council of Europe's Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (1997)—the most authoritative international agreement to date—bans inheritable genetic modification, human reproductive cloning, and research cloning while also regulating other human biotechnologies.

UNESCO, the European Parliament, the Group of Eight industrial nations, the World Health Assembly, and the United Nations have also adopted various prohibitions on human reproductive cloning.

3-person IVF and Infertility: What Kind of Slippery Slope is This?by Leah LowthorpBiopolitical TimesOctober 26th, 2016To what extent has anticipation of using 3-person IVF for infertility been part of the story from the start? While we can't know for sure, here are some possible connections.
CRISPR gene-editing controversy shows old ideas about East and West still prevailby Calvin Wai-Loon HoEcontimesOctober 24th, 2016Western imagination tends to fantasize Asian countries as an exotic, crude "other," viewing Chinese research as advancing primarily due to an assumed lack of regulation.
Reports of ‘three-parent babies’ multiplyby Sara ReardonNature NewsOctober 19th, 2016Claims of infants created using mitochondrial manipulation techniques in Mexico and China, and two pregnancies in the Ukraine, stir scientific and ethical debate.
World Bioethics Day: Human Dignity and Human Rightsby Leah LowthorpOctober 19th, 2016October 19 marks the first such international event sponsored by the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics. This year's theme of Human Dignity and Human Rights will be celebrated in 55 countries worldwide.
Mouse eggs made from skin cells in a dishby David CyranoskiNatureOctober 17th, 2016Research breakthrough sparks debate over the prospect of using stem cell techniques to produce synthetic human eggs from body tissue.
Three-person baby 'race' dangerous[citing CGS' Marcy Darnovsky]by James GallagherBBCOctober 12th, 2016Scientists and ethicists warn of fertility doctors forum-shopping to perform dangerous mitochondrial manipulation experiments.
CRISPR Embryos at Karolinska: Controversies Demand Oversightby Elliot HosmanOctober 7th, 2016Ongoing gene editing experiments in human embryos around the world underscore the need to prohibit modifying cells for use in human reproduction.
Uterus Transplants Fail Again: Why Are They So Difficult?by Rachael RettnerLive ScienceOctober 5th, 2016Four uterus transplants using live donors (a first in the U.S.) took place in Dallas with assistance from pioneering Swedish team, but three were removed due to lack of blood flow.
With New Program, DARPA To Encourage Safety "Brakes" For Gene Editingby Alex LashXconomyOctober 5th, 2016The US military R&D agency has launched a funding program called "Safe Genes" to find "safety measures that don’t slow us down."
Wrong Steps: The First One From Threeby Pete ShanksDeccan ChronicleOctober 2nd, 2016Gene-editing technology is advancing rapidly. What if we come to a consensus about what should not be allowed...and then some renegade scientists, convinced that they know best, just go ahead and do it?
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